Alot of times , arty is fired over the horizon so you need a spotter to tell you where the first shell splashed. Then the FICO or ANGLICO will call for fire for effect if no ajustments are required

What else would you want from artillery but an effect?

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Umm, depends on where you want the effect. Dropping a lot of steel rain on your own people is bad , so you want the enemy bracketed and having a bad day.

You are watching: Fire for effect meaning

Declan


Ah gotcha, going from firing to see where your shells will fall to firing because you know they’re falling where you want them to

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“Fire For Effect” is the command the observer gives the firing battery when the shell from one gun are hitting the target. The firing battery then lets loose with all guns firing at the same range and azimuth. That is to say the Fire For Effect order switches the fire from one gun for ranging to six or more guns to do a damn-damn on the Bad Guys.


Well, another story passed down from my dad (WWII 16" battleship gunner). He told me that they would just pound an island for a couple of days without any “real” target in mind just to drive the Japenase crazy. After 48 hours of shell exploding around it’s hard to one,sleep and two be on top of your game for when the invasion troops hit the beach. Quite an effect.

Today in modern times I am reminded of the pre-invasion of Iraq. That great coverage of the enemy trying to just throw up fire into the air to hit targets that they couldn’t see. That was was firing for effect as well. Drove the Iraqies crazy so that by the time that the actual troops hit they were already battle fatiqued.


flight July 3, 2005, 5:28am #7

Si Amigo, I don’t think that is the “effect” the OP is referring to, though it is undeniably one use of artillery.


Si_Amigo July 3, 2005, 5:53am #8

But he did ask: What else would you want from artillery but an effect?

Termonollogy and tactics evolve over time, but some things are tried and true. Laying siege to castle had an effect as well.


flight July 3, 2005, 7:31am #9

Good point, I didn’t realize that was the part you were referring to.


Malacandra July 3, 2005, 10:21am #10

Sometimes called “harrassing fire”, btw.


bump July 3, 2005, 4:15pm #11

Let’s see if I have this right:

One gun in a battery fires single shots that are corrected by the forward observer until they’re on target.

The observer gives the command “Fire for Effect”, meaning that all the other guns fire at the previously determined target “for effect”, meaning that they’re firing for the effect of the battery, not to get the battery on target.

Is there a “Fire for Range” or “Fire for Targeting” command? Seems like there would almost have to be, right?


QuizCustodet July 3, 2005, 7:34pm #12
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bump:

Let’s see if I have this right:

One gun in a battery fires single shots that are corrected by the forward observer until they’re on target.

The observer gives the command “Fire for Effect”, meaning that all the other guns fire at the previously determined target “for effect”, meaning that they’re firing for the effect of the battery, not to get the battery on target.

Is there a “Fire for Range” or “Fire for Targeting” command? Seems like there would almost have to be, right?

I spent several years in the British equivalent of ROTC, working as the Command Post Officer in a battery of 105 mm light howitzers. My job was to receive commands from the Forward Observers (who are holed up on the front line, looking at the target) and give the guns the appropriate orders to fulfill the observers’ intentions. Here’s the typical sequence in training:

Observer identifies a target, sends a message to tell the battery to get ready for action.

Observer tells the battery where the target is located; command post converts this information into a provisional bearing and elevation. This firing data is given to one gun, which fires a single round. The command for this is ‘Adjust Fire.’

Observer watches where the round actually falls, and sends corrections back. A new bearing/elevation is calculated, and you fire again. Repeat until the rounds fall so that the target is within the killing radius of the shell.

Observer gives the order ‘N rounds, fire for effect’ - each gun in the battery then fires N rounds on a bearing and range such that they will hit the target. Note that, as the battery is spread out on the ground, each gun is generally firing on a unique set of firing data.


Of course, if the target area has been plotted and fired upon several times so that the coordinates are known, you can arrange a Time on Target barrage. In this case, all the different batteries scattered about calculate how long it will take their particular rounds (based on distance, shell weight, and shell velocity) to reach the target and all the batteries are ordered to fire in such a way that their shells will arrive simultaneously at a predetermined moment. In that case, the targets, instead of suffering some ranging shells followed by the actual barrage, giving them time to disperse or take whatever cover they can find, suddenly find themselves in the midst of a whirlwhind of flames and screaming shell fragments with only the initial whistling to give them warning.

See more: Queen Nails Santa Maria, Ca


This is one of the most impressive lessons I learned in Basic School. The demonstration was done with mortors located fairly close to our vantagne point on a hill overlooking a large field. The first round hit way to the right of the target, so the order was given for so many “clicks” to the left. It did not take long to line up the hits with the target. Then the order was given for so many “clicks” forward which intentionally overshot the target. Then a few “clicks” were taken off and the round hit right in front of the target. That is when the order was given to “add one click and fire for effect”. I’ve often thought about what it would be like to be the target and watch each round get closer and closer, knowing that there was no escape.

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Note that, as the battery is spread out on the ground, each gun is generally firing on a unique set of firing data.

So why don’t you need to adjust fire for each gun separately? True, one could calculate corrections for the other guns, but it seems to me that these calculated corrections would be about as good as the corrections after the first spotter’s report (after the first shell, when the spotter says “two hundred meters north”, or whatever). And they usually need more than one adjustment shot, don’t they?